Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

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Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 27 janv. 2012 00:09

Owen Marshall ‎– Captain Puff In The Naked Truth (Aditi Records – private press, 1975)

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Titres

A1 Electric Flower 4:47
A2 Nana's Sleeping 3:53
A3 Peanut Butter Ice Cream Man 3:39
A4 Planet Funk 2:46

B1 Paper Man 4:04
B2 Winter Butterfly 5:46
B3 Casa Del Soul 3:39
B4 Ancient Astronauts 3:05

Crédits

Owen Marshall : claviers, flûte narration, guitare, percussions et chant
Bonita Versh : chant
Cheryl Marshall : chant
Danny Whatley : basse
Shakur Abdullah : congas
Derrick Roberts : batterie
Ernest Straughter : piano électrique
M'cheza Blue : percussions

Casa Del Soul




Planet Funk...1 petite minute d'un son qui semble intéressant au plus haut point !!

http://bamboo-music.heteml.jp/jf1512.mp3



Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In the Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 27 janv. 2012 10:37

Un peu d'histoire sur ce bonhomme :

"Wanda "Meekness" LeCato flew in from Phoenix the other day in search of her father's legacy. She went through files at the Free Library of Philadelphia main branch, interviewed about 30 people - old friends and cohorts - scrutinized photographs and publicity fliers. What she learned in her five-day stay was that her father, Owen Marshall, was an extraordinary jazz musician and composer.
"He had said in his last days that he really didn't have much to give us," said LeCato, 45. "But what he had was his music. In his music was his legacy, his wealth to us." Owen Eugene Marshall, trumpet player, composer, bandleader, craftsman and creator of the "plucktar," an oversized guitar, died of cancer four years ago in Los Angeles. He was 68.
LeCato is a Philadelphia native and had known her dad. Her trip east had several purposes, including validating his work and gathering research for a college paper she plans to write about him. Eventually, she and her older sister, Cheryl Marshall, want to create a scholarship in their father's name for young jazz composers.
"People need to know what he contributed," LeCato said. "He just never got the recognition." She remembers "a loving father" who played with her when she was a little girl growing up in the family's house in West Philadelphia. Marshall and his wife, Ida, separated when LeCato was around 3. She would join her father 11 years later in California and live with him there.
But while Marshall was in Philadelphia - before nonpayment of child support sent him fleeing to the West Coast in 1963 - the eccentric musician made a name for himself with his original compositions, unwavering musical principles and talented bands.
Musicians who passed through his groups included John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Ted Curson, Jimmy Heath, Earl and Carl Grubbs and Jimmy Garrison. Marshall's songs were picked up by Lee Morgan and Chet Baker, among others. He has 119 songs registered with BMI, LeCato said.
Marshall "was eccentric, yet balanced," said Abdul Malik Muhammad, 70, who managed the musician's big band in the late '50s and early '60s. He was smart, witty, able to see the nonsensical side of things so readily accepted as fact. "He was George Carlin, twice over," Muhammad said. Marshall's works "were very modern," said Raymond A. King, 71, a friend who played piano. "He was very progressive."
"You could hear things in the tune," Muhammad added. "There was a story in the listening."
"He was a genius," said Dave Jackson, 64, a drummer in Marshall's quintet from roughly 1955 to 1959. "This man knew music in and out."
Early in his childhood, Owen lived in Hawaii with a woman named Claribel Marshall, said his daughter. Claribel worked for a naval officer and raised Owen when his mother gave him and his brother, Thomas Cole, away.
Owen and Claribel were in Hawaii when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941. Claribel's boss was transferred to Philadelphia, and she and Owen went as well.
Marshall eventually became interested in art. As a teen, he lied about his age and got into the Army. After his discharge, he attended the Landis School of Music, and later the Ornstein School of Music in Chestnut Hill.
Marshall's wife-to-be lived across the street from him at 24th and Catharine streets. Their marriage would soon deteriorate.
"My mother and he were like opposite ends of the pole," LeCato said. "My mother was very religious and played classical music. Everything had to be A-B-C-D-E-F-G. If it was out of line, she couldn't deal with it."
Marshall seemed to stay out of line. Where Ida wanted to go to church to praise the Lord, Owen wanted to write music.
The two separated in 1958, and Marshall went to live with two brothers, Raymond and Edward Grant, at 33rd and Spring Garden streets. LeCato, her sister and mother moved to Fitzwater Street in South Philadelphia.
LeCato said her parents officially divorced in 1979 and her mother now lives in California. Marshall's brother, Thomas, was also in Philadelphia. He was a drummer and the two reconnected.
Dave Jackson played in Marshall's group, which featured Raymond Grant on piano, Lew Weldon on sax, Jimmy Garrison on bass and Marshall on trumpet. The group was formed around 1956 and stayed together three years, he said.
"We would rehearse every day in the evening from 6 to 10 p.m.," Jackson recalled. "We'd go home, and he'd still be in the cellar all night long writing music."
Looking for a break, they went to New York City, but found few gigs. "We were working for the Board of Education, scrubbing walls," Jackson said. The cleaning chemicals bothered their hands, but the job allowed them to pay their share of the rent. A frustrated Garrison "got vexed with us . . . the next thing I know, he's working with John Coltrane," Jackson said. The remaining members returned to Philadelphia.
Marshall was multi-faceted. He had strong Afrocentric leanings. He flirted with the Nation of Islam, liking its call for black empowerment, but couldn't fully accept the religion because it frowned on music. He was a craftsman who made instruments. He painted and cooked. "He took cornmeal and made it taste like tapioca pudding," Jackson said.
Marshall, described as a perfectionist when it came to his writing, briefly ran the house band in a club called Soulville USA at 39th Street and Haverford Avenue, Muhammad said. But it was shut down months later, he said, because the authorities didn't want African-Americans to get too prominent and because of reports of pot-smoking nearby. "Joint was as bad as heroin at that time," Muhammad said. And yes, Marshall did smoke weed, said LeCato.
Marshall's big band in the late '50s performed under the banner of the Guild of Contemporary Culture and played mostly at the 3-6-6 club at 51st and Market streets, Muhammad said.
The authorities once snatched Marshall right off the bandstand because of back child support he owed, his daughter said.
Tired of ducking support orders and jail, he fled to Los Angeles in 1963. When LeCato was 14, she went to live with him. "I felt I was better off with my father," LeCato said. She was joined by her sister six months later.
Although the jazz scene wasn't as hot as on the East Coast, Marshall still scraped out a living, going on the road while paying a woman to watch his daughters. He did copywriting and arranging for Grants Music Center in Los Angeles. One client was rock 'n' roller Little Richard. "He used to do music for him all the time," LeCato said.
LeCato, who took the name "Meekness" a few years ago for spiritual reasons, now lectures on African culture, leads motivational seminars and is a senior at Arizona State University. Her husband, John LeCato, a nondenominational minister, is from South Philadelphia.
She eventually wants to write a book based on her findings about her father. The mother of three (Chris, 25; Lovell, 20; and Richard, 18, who plays basketball for Arizona State) said she plans to return to Philadelphia in February and start planning for a scholarship benefit.
"He was a composer and had such a love for music that he wanted everyone to understand it," she said. If you have any information about Owen Marshall, LeCato would like to hear from you. She can be reached through e-mail at JLeCato@aol.com."

Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In the Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 27 janv. 2012 12:31

Voilà ce qu'on peut trouver comme "appréciation" de vendeurs :

This excellent and EXTREMELY rare original private pressing from 1975 is difficult to comfortably categorize. I guess you could get away with calling it a soul jazz or jazz funk LP (yes, there are funky cuts and, yes, there is a dope drum break), but that wouldn’t do this fantastic album justice as it also has strong elements of spiritual jazz, Sun Ra style space psychedelia, brooding atmospheric electronica and even one grooving calypso-like jam.
"Owen Marshall was a very interesting and creative musician (note all the instruments that he plays on this album). He’s played with truly great musicians such as Max Roach, Jackie McLean, and even Chet Baker. He received composer and arranger credits on Lee Morgan’s first two Blue Note albums and appears on both of Calvin Keys’ Black Jazz label releases. I recall the great percussionist Big Black speaking to me (in fond terms) about Owen Marshall; he played trumpet with Black back in the day.

This is a real gem of an L.A. album. It features Ernest Straughter of Horace Tapscott’s Pan Afrikan Peoples Arkestra on electric piano on the excellent tune “Peanut Butter Ice Cream Man” (which was recorded live at Compton Community College. Also, “Winter Butterfly” was recorded live at L.A.C.C."

kalibabu

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In the Naked Truth

Message par kalibabu » 27 janv. 2012 15:26

Je ne sais pas pourquoi mais la cover de cet album m'a toujours fasciné.
Je suis sûr que je ne suis pas le seul ici à vouloir absolument un LP à cause de la pochette, sans même avoir une idée du son que peut avoir le dit album...
Bon vu le prix prohibitif de l'objet, je ne suis pas près de l'avoir :exclaim:

Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In the Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 27 janv. 2012 15:32

Oui sur le net on peut le voir à 590, 1100 ou 1500 €... C'est pas pour moi...
Les pochettes... Ahhhh... C'est ce qui m'a en partie fait kiffer les vinyles... Tout a commencé par la légende du zippo "Catch A Fire" et...

:ooops: c'est du reggae je vais me faire tuer !

Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In the Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 27 janv. 2012 22:58

:shock: .... :happyboy: :drunk:
Merciiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii !!!!!!!

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funkiness
Site Admin

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

Message par funkiness » 28 janv. 2012 13:21

Trop bon pour ne pas être réédité sous peu ;)
funkiness brings you funk and happiness

Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 28 janv. 2012 19:02

:cool:
Des infos plus précises à ce sujet ?

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funkiness
Site Admin

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

Message par funkiness » 28 janv. 2012 19:58

Non, juste une intuition.

Ce genre de chose finit toujours par être réédité ;)
funkiness brings you funk and happiness

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good vibes

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

Message par good vibes » 28 janv. 2012 20:03

Bon pour cela il va falloir inonder de mail Gerald "Jazzman" pour qu'il passe à l'action !

Zou

Owen Marshall as Captain Puff - In The Naked Truth

Message par Zou » 10 févr. 2012 13:31

Merci pour le up !

Kalibabu ?... :mrgreen:

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